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On a simpler level, sexual selection occurs whenever an individual chooses a mate according to visual characteristics or even proximity.  <span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:medium;line-height:normal;"> “Natural selection is about living long enough to reproduce; sexual selection is about convincing others to mate with you.”-Geoffrey Miller</span><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:medium;line-height:normal;"> (</span>http://adarwinstudygroup.org/sexuality/<span style="line-height:normal;">)[[User:Bdolphin11|Bdolphin11]] ([[User talk:Bdolphin11|talk]])</span>
 
On a simpler level, sexual selection occurs whenever an individual chooses a mate according to visual characteristics or even proximity.  <span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:medium;line-height:normal;"> “Natural selection is about living long enough to reproduce; sexual selection is about convincing others to mate with you.”-Geoffrey Miller</span><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:medium;line-height:normal;"> (</span>http://adarwinstudygroup.org/sexuality/<span style="line-height:normal;">)[[User:Bdolphin11|Bdolphin11]] ([[User talk:Bdolphin11|talk]])</span>
   
Sexual Selection is one of the "Five Fingers of Evolution." You can remember it as the ring finger -- the one that a person wears their wedding ring on to tell everyone they have a mate! (See illustration, right.)  [[File:Sexual_selection.jpg|link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NdMnlt2keE|frame|Screencap from the Paul Anderson TED-ed video: The Five Fingers of Evolution]]It has been recognized as a powerful agent of evolutionary change, with "far reaching consequences." Sexual selection ca[[File:Weaver_and_Nest.jpg|thumb|Photo by David Leadbetter in Oman]]n influence speciation.
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Sexual Selection is one of the "Five Fingers of Evolution." You can remember it as the ring finger -- the one that a person wears their wedding ring on to tell everyone they have a mate! (See illustration, right.)  [[File:Sexual_selection.jpg|link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NdMnlt2keE|frame|Screencap from the Paul Anderson TED-ed video: The Five Fingers of Evolution]]It has been recognized as a powerful agent of evolutionary change, with "far reaching consequences." Sexual selection can influence speciation.
   
 
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"TimesNewRoman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">Intrasexual selection as discussed by Freeman & Herron (2007) involves sex to sex combat (for example males fighting males) or fighting over resources (for example a territory) to secure a mate. The opposite sex is not choosing a mate, they mate with the winners. Morphological traits or the use of tactical cleverness are involved with the success of the combat.</span>
 
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"TimesNewRoman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">Intrasexual selection as discussed by Freeman & Herron (2007) involves sex to sex combat (for example males fighting males) or fighting over resources (for example a territory) to secure a mate. The opposite sex is not choosing a mate, they mate with the winners. Morphological traits or the use of tactical cleverness are involved with the success of the combat.</span>
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<span style="font-family:'TimesNewRoman',serif;font-size:12pt;line-height:150%;">Intersexual selection as described by Freeman & Herron (2007) is when an individual chooses a mate based on interactions between two sexes. One example I can think of is the peacock.</span>
 
<span style="font-family:'TimesNewRoman',serif;font-size:12pt;line-height:150%;">Intersexual selection as described by Freeman & Herron (2007) is when an individual chooses a mate based on interactions between two sexes. One example I can think of is the peacock.</span>
   
<span style="font-family:'TimesNewRoman',serif;font-size:12pt;line-height:150%;">Sexual Selection in Birds.</span>
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<span style="font-size:12.0pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"TimesNewRoman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA"> 
 
<span style="font-family:'TimesNewRoman',serif;font-size:12pt;line-height:150%;">Birds are such beautiful examples of sexual selection...First there are the colours which are so evident especially with the Birds of Paradise in Papua New Guinea. Nowhere in the world can so many birds be found with such exquisite adornaments. There are feathers of course but there are wires and epaulettes too. But we can also see in less spectacular cases all around the global The Ruppell Weaver birds lose their bright yellow during the year and therefore are better camouflaged. A fantstic example of adaptation and sexual selection[[File:Owl_Camouflage.jpg|thumb|Scops Owl in Oman. photo by David Leadbetter]]. Secondly, the Ruppell Weavers also have the added pressure of nest building. This is usually done by striping long fronds from palm trees and threading them to make a nest. But often the male Weaver makes more then one, usually four and the female chooses the best one. This is nothing compared to the Bowerbirds. Returning to Papua New Guinea, the Bowerbirds adorn the nests with collections of colorful leaves, berries and nuts which are neatly stacked and exhibited to attract a female. Thirdly, there are the dances that male birds perform. This is famous with the Great Crested Grebes courtship dance, but equally found around the world with the Birds of Paradise in the Old World, the Mannakins of the New World and the Grouse of Northern Europe. But perhaps the most obvious are the songs of birds - sometimes for territory, often distinguishable from the bird's call, but also used to attracting a mate. Charles Darwin wrote in The Descent of Man (1871), "The diversity of sounds...and the diversity of the means for producing such sounds, are highly remarkable. We thus gain a high idea of their importance for sexual purposes." The shape and strength of the beak are important but for the Mannakins of Ecuador there is an extra feature - club like wings that knock together to produce sounds. </span>
 
 
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"TimesNewRoman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">  Koppel, D. (2012) The Virtuoso. National Geographic. May 2012. pp62-69
 
 
</span>
 
</span>
   
 
Andersson, M. B. (1994). ''Sexual selection''. Princeton University Press.
 
Andersson, M. B. (1994). ''Sexual selection''. Princeton University Press.
   
<span style="font-size:9.5pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri;mso-bidi-font-family: "TimesNewRoman";color:black;background:white;mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">Freeman, S. & Herron, J. (2007). Evolutionary Analysis 4th Ed. Sexual Selection, pp 401-441.</span>
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<span style="font-size:9.5pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri;mso-bidi-font-family: "TimesNewRoman";color:black;background:white;mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">Freeman, S. & Herron, J. (2007). Evolutionary Analysis 4th Ed. Sexual Selection, pp 401-441.[[File:Natural Selection Tale of the Peacock-0|thumb|right|335 px]]</span>
 
<span style="font-size:9.5pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri;mso-bidi-font-family: "TimesNewRoman";color:black;background:white;mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">Sexual selection can make animals go to the extremes to obtain a mate to breed with.  A great mammalian example of this is the Elephant Seal.  Male elephant seals will defend their territory and fight other seals to protect it. Sometimes, this territorial protection puts them into conflict humans.   Check out the video to see how sexual selection drives male elephants seals to be highly protective of their territory. [[File:Elephant Seal Attacks Divers-0|thumb|right|335 px]][[File:World's Deadliest - Elephant Seal vs. Elephant Seal-1|thumb|right|335 px]]</span>
 
A
 
 
<span style="font-size:9.5pt;line-height:150%; font-family:"Verdana","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri;mso-bidi-font-family: "TimesNewRoman";color:black;background:white;mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">[[File:Natural Selection Tale of the Peacock-0|thumb|right|335 px]]</span>
 
   
 
[[File:Sexual Selection & Evolution|thumb|left|285px|YouTube segment of the video "Why Sex" from PBS's Nova Evolution series covering sexual selection and evolution]]
 
[[File:Sexual Selection & Evolution|thumb|left|285px|YouTube segment of the video "Why Sex" from PBS's Nova Evolution series covering sexual selection and evolution]]
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[[Category:Macroevolution]]
 
[[Category:Macroevolution]]
 
[[Category:Evolutionary History of Bats: Order Chiroptera]]
 
[[Category:Evolutionary History of Bats: Order Chiroptera]]
[[Category:Human evolution]]
 

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